Diamond ring Kiev A World of Color: Colored Diamond Trend (And How to Shop It)Diamonds are a girl’s best friend – at least that’s what they say. But in the past, this statement has referred to the traditional white or colorless diamond. Nowadays, however, a trend is emerging in the world of diamonds that seems to be growing by the minute. While white diamonds are still bought and sold in high volume, the allure of colored diamonds has taken over. From investors to jewelers to gem collectors and jewelry shoppers, color seems to be the name of the game. But how do you shop for these diamonds? Is the grading scale the same? What are the makings of a quality colored diamond?

The Four C’s Are still in Play

 One of the things that people often wonder about is whether or not the traditional “Four C’s” of diamond evaluation and purchasing are still in play. The short answer – yes. Cut, Carat, and Clarity are graded exactly the same. The only “C” that you should approach differently is, of course, color. When you’re evaluating a white diamond, the less color the better. Obviously, if you’re evaluating a fancy color diamond, less color would be counter-intuitive. Instead, you’ll want to make sure the color is vibrant. The more vibrant and eye-catching the color of your diamond is, the higher quality it is.

What About the Grading Scale?

Another question people often ask regarding colored diamonds is whether or not the grading scale is still the same. Essentially yes – the idea behind the grading scale is the same. But the scale itself is a bit different. In a traditional D to Z-N scale, which is used for colorless diamonds or white diamonds, D-F are colorless diamonds – the highest quality. G through J are near-colorless, and K-M and Z-N have noticeable color – usually yellow – which most fine jewelers do not carry. When it comes to fancy color diamonds, the three things that are of highest importance are hue, tone, and saturation, according to the Gemological Institute of America. In essence, the color end of the grading scale is used, but more color is seen as favorable instead of less favorable as it would be with a white diamond. While many fancy color diamonds are incredibly pricey (including some diamonds of only five to 10 carats that have sold for millions of dollars), there are colored diamonds that are more accessible, as well. Many jewelers offer fancy colored diamonds – like chocolate diamonds and others – and even the traditionally white engagement ring has taken a side seat to color for some. Whether it’s for an investment or a unique gift (even if you’re gifting yourself), colored diamonds are well worth a look.

Pink diamond A World of Color: Colored Diamond Trend (And How to Shop It)

Are All Colored Diamonds Rare?

Since diamonds are not naturally colored, all fancy color diamonds are rare in their own right. However, there are some colors that are far rarer than others. For instance, red and purple are among the rarest colors in the world for diamonds. Pure pink – meaning a pink with absolutely no modifying colors present – is also quite rare (and highly sought after). As far as intensity – which is how the quality of a colored diamond is gauged – fancy-vivid is the highest quality, and is also among the rarest classification of diamond you can find.

While many fancy color diamonds are incredibly pricey (including some diamonds of only five to 10 carats that have sold for millions of dollars), there are colored diamonds that are more accessible, as well. Many jewelers offer fancy colored diamonds – like chocolate diamonds and others – and even the traditionally white engagement ring has taken a side seat to color for some. Whether it’s for an investment or a unique gift (even if you’re gifting yourself), colored diamonds are well worth a look.

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